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Group Finally Schedules Conversation about How Much Fun It Would Be to Play D&D Some Time
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Ubiquitous
2017-09-20 16:09:40 UTC
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BINGHAMTON, N.Y. — Zack Borman and a few of his friends were able to
set aside a few hours, after months of scheduling conflicts and
last-minute dropouts, to talk about how they’d all like to play
Dungeons and Dragons at some point in the future, according to close
sources.

“It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a while,” said Borman. “I see
a lot of people online talk about Dungeons and Dragons, and every
time I tell myself, ‘that’s a game I’d love to talk to my friends
about playing if we could ever all get together.’”

“I’m just glad we were finally able to nail down a time for us to
get together and nail down a time to play D&D,” he added.

According to those close to the group, preparations for the
conversation have reportedly been underway for weeks. Borman has
been busy getting materials together, queuing up clips of Dan
Harmon’s “Harmonquest,” and reading through the top posts of the D&D
subreddit—trying to wrap his head around the complicated world of
deciding to play Dungeons and Dragons.

Sources confirm he has even thought about surprising his friends
with an anecdote he heard from a friend who played once in college.

“I’m excited to be the Dungeon Master for the group’s scheduling
conversation campaign,” Borman continued. “Do I suggest we play
through an existing campaign? Do I throw out the idea of writing a
custom campaign once I’ve read a little more about the rules? There
really aren’t any boundaries on where this thing can go and I’m
curious to see how my friends will work together to navigate the
unknown territories of figuring out when we are all available.”

The conversation is tentatively set for this Sunday afternoon around
4:00pm, but will likely have to be pushed back depending on when
Justin is able to leave his cousin’s birthday party. Rumors are
circulating that Gary might even bring this girl he’s been seeing,
who’s not super into this kind of stuff, but she’s cool and the guys
will really like her.

At press time, a member of the group had purchased a d20 but did not
realize the need for other types of dice.
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Spalls Hurgenson
2017-09-21 13:40:17 UTC
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Post by Ubiquitous
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. — Zack Borman and a few of his friends were able to
set aside a few hours, after months of scheduling conflicts and
last-minute dropouts, to talk about how they’d all like to play
Dungeons and Dragons at some point in the future, according to close
sources.
<snip funny anecdote>

Just wait until they get to the part where they have to decide which
EDITION of D&D they are going to play. That'll eat up three or four
meetings at least.



Man, D&D used to be so much easier. "Hey, wanna play D&D?" "Yeah,
okay, how 'bout 4 PM?" "Fine, I'll round up Bob and Jim and we'll meet
at your place". Boom, done. It took longer to decide who was bringing
the munchies.


Now we all have to worry about whether the boss will need us to come
in that day, or if we have tickets to some show in the evening, or if
a babysitter will be available to watch the kids, or if that's the day
we've set aside to finally clean-out-the-gutters
no-we-can't-put-it-off because-if-we-don't-the-roof-is-gonna-leak or
even whether the traffic is going to be so bad that it just isn't
worth driving to the meeting place because by the time we get there
everyone else will be packing up to go home, or a hundred other
considerations that never would have crossed our minds when we were
younger.

(yes, I know people game over the internet, but that's nowhere near as
appealing. Half the fun is the human interaction; derisively throwing
Cheetos at the DM when he makes a cliched story choice, or you and
your buds frantically chasing after a die that's fallen off the table
when you make a life-or-death roll.* And it's not really D&D unless it
involves that funk that develops from four or six sweaty people
sitting in a too-small room filled with beer, pizza and chips. )

At least dice aren't an issue anymore; I bought a bunch of packaged
dice-sets on the cheap and if you've never played before (or if you
forget your own) I just give you one for free. Of course, the dice
aren't very good (they were cheap, after all) and if you forget to
bring yours, we all make fun of you "Look like Daniel's playing with
the Tube Dice** tonight. No twenties for him!"

As for the younger generation, I have no idea how they'd ever even
start gaming. Between parents who overstuff their days with
after-school activities and competing attention-saps from the
Internet, smartphones and video-games, an old-school hobby like
table-top gaming doesn't stand a chance. Well, not unless some geezer
forces them into the game, but us old-timers barely have enough time
for our own campaigns, much less run one for the urchins.

It makes me grateful everytime our group /does/ manage to get
together, even though that's never often enough. For all the amazingly
futuristic communication technology we have at our fingertips, getting
five busy people to regularly meet up is still a feat worth
appreciating.


* Inevitably ending in one or two results: "It's a sixteen! He made
the jump" or "It's a fifteen, but it doesn't count because it fell off
the table."

** the dice are packaged in a plastic tube. That's why we call them
Tube Dice. We are a very creative group when it comes to naming stuff
;-)
Justisaur
2017-09-25 17:22:18 UTC
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Post by Spalls Hurgenson
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. — Zack Borman and a few of his friends were able to
set aside a few hours, after months of scheduling conflicts and
last-minute dropouts, to talk about how they’d all like to play
Dungeons and Dragons at some point in the future, according to close
sources.
<snip funny anecdote>
Just wait until they get to the part where they have to decide which
EDITION of D&D they are going to play. That'll eat up three or four
meetings at least.
Man, D&D used to be so much easier. "Hey, wanna play D&D?" "Yeah,
okay, how 'bout 4 PM?" "Fine, I'll round up Bob and Jim and we'll meet
at your place". Boom, done. It took longer to decide who was bringing
the munchies.
Now we all have to worry about whether the boss will need us to come
in that day, or if we have tickets to some show in the evening, or if
a babysitter will be available to watch the kids, or if that's the day
we've set aside to finally clean-out-the-gutters
no-we-can't-put-it-off because-if-we-don't-the-roof-is-gonna-leak or
even whether the traffic is going to be so bad that it just isn't
worth driving to the meeting place because by the time we get there
everyone else will be packing up to go home, or a hundred other
considerations that never would have crossed our minds when we were
younger.
(yes, I know people game over the internet, but that's nowhere near as
appealing. Half the fun is the human interaction; derisively throwing
Cheetos at the DM when he makes a cliched story choice, or you and
your buds frantically chasing after a die that's fallen off the table
when you make a life-or-death roll.* And it's not really D&D unless it
involves that funk that develops from four or six sweaty people
sitting in a too-small room filled with beer, pizza and chips. )
It's still pretty fun. I brought some newbies into it that way last
year. Text chat only on Roll20. It's quite a bit easier to schedule
since you don't have to go anywhere, and I did 2 hour blocks, so setting
aside that much time isn't too hard.

I've run some mutant future that way with voice a couple years ago that
went pretty well. I'd say it was about 90% as good as a real game.

My only real problem with it is that prepping maps takes way more time.
yes you can do without the maps, but it really loses a lot without the
maps online.

I actually ran a game for a couple hours at the local monthly meetup
this month too.

As to edition, it's pretty much 5e. Getting players for other editions
is difficult to say the least. Unfortunately I don't find 5e very good
for introducing players (or particularly good period.) I decided to run
BURPG at the meetup, but only could get 2 players of the large group of
newbies to try it. It took about 5 minutes to get their characters set
up, where the other group of 5e was still going at character creation
something like an hour and a half into the game.

- Justisaur

Anonymous Jack
2017-09-25 16:38:23 UTC
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BINGHAMTON, N.Y. — Zack Borman and a few of his friends were able to
set aside a few hours, after months of scheduling conflicts and
last-minute dropouts, to talk about how they’d all like to play
Dungeons and Dragons at some point in the future, according to close
sources.
Great story, hits close to home :)

we talked about having dinner sometime, to talk about playing at some time in the future and to roll up characters. It's been about 6~9 months now and we still haven't been able to make dinner happen.

At least we've settled on 2nd Ed, because only one person volunteered to DM
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