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A misunderstood monster!
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Loren Pechtel
2018-01-15 21:02:56 UTC
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https://apnews.com/3fa84753b4eb4cbdaca21ed180fd1e1a

His life was saved by a black pudding!
Spalls Hurgenson
2018-01-16 14:34:02 UTC
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On Mon, 15 Jan 2018 13:02:56 -0800, Loren Pechtel
Post by Loren Pechtel
https://apnews.com/3fa84753b4eb4cbdaca21ed180fd1e1a
His life was saved by a black pudding!
But...but... why did he use it as a battering ram? Black Puddings are
corrosive and can disolve wood and metal. Just slather some on the
lock and stand back (exactly how you'd slather something so corrosive
is left as an exercise for the viewer).

Personally, I've never liked using puddings and slimes in games. They
are neat monsters, but mechanically feel too much like instant-kill
(or at least damage) traps where the players have very little chance
of getting out of the encounter without damage.

Plus, you'd expect a nearly unstoppable killing machine like that to
take over whole environments once unleashed into the world. I mean,
they can't be killed by acid, cold or poison, and lightning and melee
attacks just cut them in half. The natural world hasn't a chance
against them, they eat anything and they reproduce by simple fission.
Presumably in the resource-starved underdark the lack of food keeps
them in check but released into a forest I'd expect nothing but slime
left in a month (which might make for an interesting adventure, even
if it is just basically a rehash of "The Blob").

I always feel dirty when I use them.
Zaghadka
2018-01-17 17:27:54 UTC
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On Tue, 16 Jan 2018 09:34:02 -0500, in rec.games.frp.dnd, Spalls
Post by Spalls Hurgenson
On Mon, 15 Jan 2018 13:02:56 -0800, Loren Pechtel
Post by Loren Pechtel
https://apnews.com/3fa84753b4eb4cbdaca21ed180fd1e1a
His life was saved by a black pudding!
But...but... why did he use it as a battering ram? Black Puddings are
corrosive and can disolve wood and metal. Just slather some on the
lock and stand back (exactly how you'd slather something so corrosive
is left as an exercise for the viewer).
Personally, I've never liked using puddings and slimes in games. They
are neat monsters, but mechanically feel too much like instant-kill
(or at least damage) traps where the players have very little chance
of getting out of the encounter without damage.
Plus, you'd expect a nearly unstoppable killing machine like that to
take over whole environments once unleashed into the world. I mean,
they can't be killed by acid, cold or poison, and lightning and melee
attacks just cut them in half. The natural world hasn't a chance
against them, they eat anything and they reproduce by simple fission.
Presumably in the resource-starved underdark the lack of food keeps
them in check but released into a forest I'd expect nothing but slime
left in a month (which might make for an interesting adventure, even
if it is just basically a rehash of "The Blob").
I always feel dirty when I use them.
My GM ran a module where one of the first encounters was a bunch of
invisible trolls with long pikes that had glass balls on the end which
contained a black pudding in each. They would break them over your plate
mail wearing paladin's head (and then appear).

Once we figured out the encounter, we just climbed back up the ladder and
threw Sunburst into the room until well done. Or we threw shatter while
they held their pikes high (the room kept getting reset). Shatter works
really well in that situation. *Then* we tossed Sunburst until cooked.

Fun times. Everything in D&D has a solution.

But yeah, I've got the 2e Monstrous Manual open in front of me right now,
and the interesting thing about that edition is almost every monster has
an "ecology" section. They made an *attempt* to describe how things could
actually exist and coexist, in opposition to the 1e trend of a chaotic,
unexplainable menagerie ("Wizards did it!") in an underground maze.

For the entry on "Pudding, Deadly," which includes black puddings, they
just gave up and all they have to say about it is how long it takes to
dissolve +3 plate mail. They're basically fighter-fucker-uppers. That's
why they exist.

Ecology? No. It's pretty much a punt. LOL.
--
Zag

No one ever said on their deathbed, 'Gee, I wish I had
spent more time alone with my computer.' ~Dan(i) Bunten
Spalls Hurgenson
2018-01-18 14:46:28 UTC
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Post by Zaghadka
Post by Spalls Hurgenson
On Mon, 15 Jan 2018 13:02:56 -0800, Loren Pechtel
Post by Loren Pechtel
https://apnews.com/3fa84753b4eb4cbdaca21ed180fd1e1a
His life was saved by a black pudding!
But yeah, I've got the 2e Monstrous Manual open in front of me right now,
and the interesting thing about that edition is almost every monster has
an "ecology" section. They made an *attempt* to describe how things could
actually exist and coexist, in opposition to the 1e trend of a chaotic,
unexplainable menagerie ("Wizards did it!") in an underground maze.
For the entry on "Pudding, Deadly," which includes black puddings, they
just gave up and all they have to say about it is how long it takes to
dissolve +3 plate mail. They're basically fighter-fucker-uppers. That's
why they exist.
Ecology? No. It's pretty much a punt. LOL.
I recall someone here (SeaWasp?) once gave the history of the original
dungeon-ooze; it was (IIRC) a giant paramecium stuffed into a dungeon
hallway, more as a trap than a monster encounter. It's obvious the
rest of the slime-family are just variations on a theme, more
interested in mechanical adaptations than narrative changes. "The last
slime could only be hurt by fire; how about this time they come across
a slime that can only be hurt by cold and is HEALED by fire? We'll
make it plaid to diffentiate it from all the others." When that's how
you start designing monsters, it leaves very little room for logic and
consistency. Of course, dungeon-crawling was the end-all, be-all of
the day, so considering how these creatures would exist outside the
dungeon wasn't even a consideration.

I remember the old Dragon magazines spent a lot of ink trying to
create sensible ecologies for a lot of the old monsters ("The Ecology
of the Roper","The Ecology of the Su-Monster", etc.) but I don't
recall if they ever tried to work out a place in the natural order for
the oozes, slimes 'n' jellies.
JimP
2018-01-18 17:35:27 UTC
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On Thu, 18 Jan 2018 09:46:28 -0500, Spalls Hurgenson
Post by Spalls Hurgenson
Post by Zaghadka
Post by Spalls Hurgenson
On Mon, 15 Jan 2018 13:02:56 -0800, Loren Pechtel
Post by Loren Pechtel
https://apnews.com/3fa84753b4eb4cbdaca21ed180fd1e1a
His life was saved by a black pudding!
But yeah, I've got the 2e Monstrous Manual open in front of me right now,
and the interesting thing about that edition is almost every monster has
an "ecology" section. They made an *attempt* to describe how things could
actually exist and coexist, in opposition to the 1e trend of a chaotic,
unexplainable menagerie ("Wizards did it!") in an underground maze.
For the entry on "Pudding, Deadly," which includes black puddings, they
just gave up and all they have to say about it is how long it takes to
dissolve +3 plate mail. They're basically fighter-fucker-uppers. That's
why they exist.
Ecology? No. It's pretty much a punt. LOL.
I recall someone here (SeaWasp?) once gave the history of the original
dungeon-ooze; it was (IIRC) a giant paramecium stuffed into a dungeon
hallway, more as a trap than a monster encounter. It's obvious the
rest of the slime-family are just variations on a theme, more
interested in mechanical adaptations than narrative changes. "The last
slime could only be hurt by fire; how about this time they come across
a slime that can only be hurt by cold and is HEALED by fire? We'll
make it plaid to diffentiate it from all the others." When that's how
you start designing monsters, it leaves very little room for logic and
consistency. Of course, dungeon-crawling was the end-all, be-all of
the day, so considering how these creatures would exist outside the
dungeon wasn't even a consideration.
I remember the old Dragon magazines spent a lot of ink trying to
create sensible ecologies for a lot of the old monsters ("The Ecology
of the Roper","The Ecology of the Su-Monster", etc.) but I don't
recall if they ever tried to work out a place in the natural order for
the oozes, slimes 'n' jellies.
The Fantasy Trip's Melee and Advanced Melee, which Steve Jackson got
his right gack to them, has lots of slimes in it for monsters.

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